Month: April 2014

Thought Questions, day 34: Would you rather have less work or more work you actually enjoy doing?

I got these questions from Danielle’s blog Underland to Wonderland, where I came across a post in which she talked about the website Thought Questions and their 365 thought-provoking questions to ask yourself. My friends Katrin, Celeste and Jasmine have also been answering these questions, so be sure to go check out their blogs too!

Day 34: Would you rather have less work or more work you actually enjoy doing?

More! I switched jobs even though I knew I’d be taking on much, much more work because I knew I’d be going into a job I would truly enjoy, as opposed to a job that was fairly easy but kind of boring. I think that when you truly enjoy what you’re doing, the work seems less. Plus, I’m the sort of person who is happiest when she’s busy and can look back on a full day of accomplishments.


Thought Questions, day 33: If you could choose one book as a mandatory read for all high school students, which book would you choose?

I got these questions from Danielle’s blog Underland to Wonderland, where I came across a post in which she talked about the website Thought Questions and their 365 thought-provoking questions to ask yourself. My friends Katrin, Celeste and Jasmine have also been answering these questions, so be sure to go check out their blogs too!

Day 33: If you could choose one book as a mandatory read for all high school students, which book would you choose?

Obviously it’s really hard for me to pick just one book (one! Can you imagine?!) but if there’s one book I would hand to my teenage self, it would be The Art of Happiness by the Dalai Lama. I’ve been nibbling my way through this volume since January and it’s had a huge impact on my mindset over these past few months. I feel like the teenage and young adult years are so tumultuous and it’s so hard to figure out what’s important and will really make you happy–especially when you’re dealing with all of the young adult drama of first jobs, first apartments, young relationships, etc. This book actually looks at Buddhist principles relating to happiness from the perspective of a Western psychologist (Howard C. Cutler, who co-authored the book), so you don’t have to be a Buddhist or even remotely religious to benefit from the text.

(By the way, please don’t take my multi-month reading of this book to mean that it’s super-long or dry, because it isn’t. It’s just one of those books that’s best read in small chunks, so you can really think about what the Dalai Lama is saying and how to put it into practice in your daily life.)

Thought Questions, day 32: What do we all have in common besides our genes that makes us human?

I got these questions from Danielle’s blog Underland to Wonderland, where I came across a post in which she talked about the website Thought Questions and their 365 thought-provoking questions to ask yourself. My friends Katrin, Celeste and Jasmine have also been answering these questions, so be sure to go check out their blogs too!

Day 32: What do we all have in common besides our genes that makes us human?

I think emotions make us human–the ability to love or hate without rational reasons to back up your feelings, the ability to feel sadness or anger, the ability to be happy and joyful. Every human being feels some kind of emotion each day, and those emotions affect our actions and our relationships with other humans in a way that can’t be replicated by a machine.


Thought Questions, day 31: If the average human lifespan was 40 years, how would you live your life differently?

I got these questions from Danielle’s blog Underland to Wonderland, where I came across a post in which she talked about the website Thought Questions and their 365 thought-provoking questions to ask yourself. My friends Katrin, Celeste and Jasmine have also been answering these questions, so be sure to go check out their blogs too!

Day 31: If the average human lifespan was 40 years, how would you live your life differently?

I wouldn’t hesitate at anything, ever–why would you, when you’re going to die young anyway? There’s no need to worry about saving for retirement, or plotting out a twenty-year plan. I would travel around the world and say yes to every new opportunity that came my way without a thought for the future. I would probably be a little more foolhardy than I am now, which wouldn’t be a good thing, but I would definitely feel much less inhibited by worries about the future.