books

Book review: ‘Terrible Virtue’

'Terrible Virtue' is a fictionalized autobiography of Margaret Sanger, the birth control pioneer who founded what would become Planned Parenthood.“Fictional autobiography” is a weird term, but it’s the best way to describe Terrible Virtue. It’s a fictionalized account of Margaret Sanger’s life, written from her POV, from her childhood through her work as a birth control advocate. I’m a little embarrassed to admit that I knew very little about Sanger before reading this book, so it was interesting to use this book as a jumping-off point for further research. Unfortunately, while this book was an enjoyable way to ease into biography (never one of my favorite genres), it was lacking in a lot of ways. (more…)

What I read: June 2016

I almost managed to go through thirteen books this month, but a couple of DNFs threw me off. Nonetheless, I still had a couple of (surprisingly) good titles. A bit belated, here’s everything I read in the month of June!

What I read: June 2016 (more…)

The five people you meet on Goodreads

I spend a lot of time on Goodreads, browsing reviews, writing reviews, and looking for new books to read. And although I don’t spend a ton of time interacting with other users (even online, I’m shy!) I can’t help but notice that there are five people you meet on Goodreads…

The reader with a better bookshelf than you. Their shelves are packed with Pulitzer Prize winners, New York Times bestsellers, and literary fiction that could double as a doorstop. They think anyone who enjoys Dan Brown is a plebeian and they don’t mind telling you so.

The five people you meet on Goodreads: the reader with a better bookshelf than you

The reader who is still stuck on that one book they read three years ago. Nothing else can measure up and accordingly most of what they read will be rated two or three stars and bemoaned as a poor replica. They’re so over all the Katniss clones, cheap Night Circuses, and would-be Gone Girls. Can someone please write something original and good for them already? They’re getting a little bored over here.

The five people you meet on Goodreads: the reader who is still stuck on that one book they read three years ago

The reader who is such a fan. They’re full of GIFs and OTPs and OMGs and flails. They heart all the books and they’re dying waiting for the next book by their favorite author to come out.

The five people you meet on Goodreads: the reader who is such a fan

The reader who comments at length on every review they disagree with. Get ready, because they’re going to explain exactly why you’re wrong. (And you just know that you are.)

The five people you meet on Goodreads: the reader who comments at length on every review they disagree with

The reader who doesn’t “do” stars. Because, as they’re happy to explain, often and in great detail, a three-star rating makes no sense. Why would you rate a book only three-fifths readable? Either a book is worth recommending or it’s not.

The five people you meet on Goodreads: the reader who doesn't "do" stars

If I’m honest, I’m one of the people you meet on Goodreads too—I’m probably #2! (Okay, okay, I am #2.) What about you—are you one of the people on my list? Or another type altogether?

Top Ten Tuesday: ten reasons I still love paper books more than e-readers

Top Ten Tuesday: ten reasons I still love paper books more than e-readersI own two e-readers and download new books to my Kindle every month, but I still prefer paper books. (In particular,  I love paperbacks—I don’t know why, but if I have a choice between buying a hardback or a paperback, the paperback wins every time.) This sounds weird, but there’s something about the way a paperback feels when you hold it that is so much more personal than holding a Kindle. The cover curls back, the spine cracks, the corners get all worn and nubby from being tucked in a backpack…you just don’t get that same sense of a well-loved book from a screen.

That isn’t the only reason I still prefer paper books to e-readers. One of my biggest joys as a rabid reader is passing on favorite books to my friends. You can’t leave an e-book in a coworker’s locker or exchange it at the Little Free Library for another reader to enjoy. You don’t get that same sense of a book that’s been passed through multiple hands and enjoyed by multiple readers.

Other reasons I prefer paper books:

  • you don’t have to worry about the battery dying right at the good part
  • they’re easier to read outside in the sun (no cranking up the screen brightness!)
  • they’re often cheaper ($1 at Goodwill)
  • you can fall asleep reading without worrying about dropping them and cracking them
  • they smell good
  • the words just look better on paper than on a screen (at least I think so)
  • you can gift-wrap them
  • a full bookshelf doubles as home decor

What about you, readers? Do you prefer paper books or e-books? I will admit that when I travel, it’s nice to bring a whole “shelf” with me in one slim package…but especially at home, my heart will always belong to paper books! If you linked up for Top Ten Tuesday this week leave me a link so I can check out your post!

Unpopular bookish opinions tag

Unpopular bookish opinions tag

(Original photo by Lou Levit via Unsplash)

I first saw the “unpopular bookish opinions” tag over on Two Book Thieves and couldn’t wait to answer the questions! Like any rabid bookworm I have a lot of opinions about what I read, and while everyone talks about the books they love, we usually don’t spend a lot of time talking about the books we don’t love. (And for good reason—no one likes a Negative Nelly. But sometimes, you have to let it out!)

Here are nine questions from the Thieves and my answers! (more…)