Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday: ten reasons I still love paper books more than e-readers

Top Ten Tuesday: ten reasons I still love paper books more than e-readersI own two e-readers and download new books to my Kindle every month, but I still prefer paper books. (In particular,  I love paperbacks—I don’t know why, but if I have a choice between buying a hardback or a paperback, the paperback wins every time.) This sounds weird, but there’s something about the way a paperback feels when you hold it that is so much more personal than holding a Kindle. The cover curls back, the spine cracks, the corners get all worn and nubby from being tucked in a backpack…you just don’t get that same sense of a well-loved book from a screen.

That isn’t the only reason I still prefer paper books to e-readers. One of my biggest joys as a rabid reader is passing on favorite books to my friends. You can’t leave an e-book in a coworker’s locker or exchange it at the Little Free Library for another reader to enjoy. You don’t get that same sense of a book that’s been passed through multiple hands and enjoyed by multiple readers.

Other reasons I prefer paper books:

  • you don’t have to worry about the battery dying right at the good part
  • they’re easier to read outside in the sun (no cranking up the screen brightness!)
  • they’re often cheaper ($1 at Goodwill)
  • you can fall asleep reading without worrying about dropping them and cracking them
  • they smell good
  • the words just look better on paper than on a screen (at least I think so)
  • you can gift-wrap them
  • a full bookshelf doubles as home decor

What about you, readers? Do you prefer paper books or e-books? I will admit that when I travel, it’s nice to bring a whole “shelf” with me in one slim package…but especially at home, my heart will always belong to paper books! If you linked up for Top Ten Tuesday this week leave me a link so I can check out your post!

Top Ten Tuesday: beach reads!

Top Ten TuesdayIt’s been quite a while since I’ve linked up for Top Ten Tuesday! This week we’re talking about our favorite beach reads. I’m not a big beach person—we don’t have a lot in the traditional sense where I live—but I am all about lying in the hammock in my backyard with a good book and a tall glass of iced tea!

I don’t really stick to any particular genre or style of book when picking out beach reads. They just have to be so compelling you can’t put them down, and they should be something that’s not too serious—no nonfiction exposes or tear-jerking fiction. Also, they should preferably be in paperback. Hardcovers are too heavy for casual summer lounging!

So, here are ten books I plan to tote out to the hammock this summer, and quite possible devour in a single gulp. I’m sure there are many, many more to be found in the depths of my TBR list but these are just some of the more recent, off-the-top-of-my-head titles.

TTT: beach reads edition!

The Three, by Sarah Lotz // Dark Matter, by Blake Crouch // Tell the Wolves I’m Home, by Carol Rifka Brunt // And I Darken, by Kiersten White // We Could Be Beautiful, by Swan Huntley // The Sister, by Louise Jensen // This is a Book, by Demetri Martin // The Hanged Man, by P.N. Elrod // Norwegian by Night, by Derek B. Miller // Let’s Pretend This Never Happened, by Jenny Lawson

I’ve linked here to the Goodreads pages for these books so you can look up the blurbs and add them to your own TBR lists! If you have any other beach reads you think I might like, be sure to leave me a comment and let me know!

Top Ten Tuesday: books to read if you are in the mood to become a better writer

Top Ten Tuesday: books that will teach you how to become a better writerHappy March everyone! This week’s TTT topic was a little open—it’s just a list of books to read if you’re in the mood for _____. I’ve been trying to get back into writing and was thinking of some of the books I’ve read that have really taught me a thing or two about writing along the way. I suppose you could say they are helping me become a better writer. (They’re all favorites and well worth re-reading just for how awesome they are, even if you aren’t a writer, BTW.) In no particular order…

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Top Ten Tuesday: music and books that go together

Top Ten Tuesday: music and books that go togetherI love books. I love music. So you’ll excuse the narcissism if I say that I feel like this week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic (hosted by The Broke and the Bookish) was tailor-made for me! This week it’s all about music and books that go together—books that could have theme songs, songs that should become books, etc. Obviously I could go on and on about my favorite books and favorite songs but here are ten that really fit together perfectly (at least in my mind).

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Top Ten Tuesday: historical and futuristic settings I love

Top Ten Tuesday: historical and futuristic settings I loveIt’s time once again for Top Ten Tuesday, hosted by The Broke and the Bookish! This week we’re discussing the historical and futuristic settings we love best. I love both genres but lately I’ve read lots of dystopia, since it seems to be a popular genre of late and I do really like sci-fi. Here are ten books with historical and futuristic settings that I’ve really loved, broken down book by book.

Outlander, by Diana Gabaldon. Well, it’s historical fiction, time travel, adventure, mystery, and romance, all rolled into one, so it touches multiple bases in my genre-reading category. But I really enjoy seeing historical events through the eyes of a modern woman (Claire). She’s feisty and outspoken and constantly gets into trouble for her big mouth.

The Knife of Never Letting Go, by Patrick Ness. I always find it interesting to read about a futuristic society without realizing it—that is, you don’t start to get hints of a sci-fi story until several chapters in. Some sci-fi authors seems to feel the need to hit you over the head with the sci-fi elements so I appreciate subtlety.

Lock In, by John Scalzi. This book blew me away with the writing. I’ve read very few sci-fi books that so subtly slip in details and background and manage to weave such a complex story without confusing you or resorting to info dumps. Supposedly this was the start of a series but I haven’t seen any updates on further installments.

The Map of Time and The Map of the Sky, by Felix J. Palma. Historical sci-fi is so awesome and yet so rare (at least to my knowledge). These books feature H.G. Wells as a protagonist in Victorian London, and yet they deal with sci-fi elements like time travel and alien invasions. I can’t explain how awesome they are, you just need to read them. I just found out that The Map of Chaos was published recently and now I can’t wait to read it and see how the trilogy wraps up!

Best historical and futuristic settings in books

Station Eleven, by Emily St. John Mandel, and The Martian Chronicles, by Ray Bradbury. Sci-fi, dystopia, and other futuristic books can sometimes feel mechanical or too formulaic, so I always appreciate finding a futuristic tale that’s beautifully written. Both of these books look at a post-apocalyptic human future, though one focuses on earth and one is set in outer space. The writing is lyrical and the pacing just perfect. I will definitely re-read these books in the future.

In the Land of Armadillos, by Helen Maryles Shankman and The Snow Child, by Eowyn Ivey. One is a collection of interwoven short stories set in World War II-era Poland, the other is a novel set in Alaska during the time of settlers, gold rushes, and new frontiers. Both blend historical fact with fiction and a healthy dose of magical realism, for a result unlike anything else I’ve encountered.

Abandon, by Blake Crouch. I love it when an author takes a historical mystery and makes up their own story for it. This one had a really creepy bent to it that made it perfect for horror novel lovers as well.

So what historical and futuristic settings do you love best? Do you prefer historical fiction or futuristic stories? Are futuristic stories that aren’t super sci-fi cool or do you prefer lots of otherworldly tech and dystopia? What about historical stories—do you like lots of period details, or do you like it when the author uses their imagination?