• books

    Book review: Girls’ Night Out, by Liz Fenton & Lisa Steinke

    Girls' Night Out, by Liz Fenton & Lisa SteinkeThree is definitely a crowd for a group of estranged friends trying to make amends on a girls’ getaway. When Ashley, Natalie and Lauren book a vacation in Mexico, they’re hoping it will be a chance to repair their damaged relationship. But after a rowdy girls’ night out, Natalie and Lauren wake up to discover Ashley has disappeared.

    Did she leave of her own free will with a man she met just days earlier? Or is it possible he’s harmed her? Then there’s the explosive avalanche of secrets the three women have been keeping from each other. Could the tension between them have led to a violent confrontation?

  • books

    Book review: Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?, by Alyssa Mastromonaco with Lauren Oyler

    Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?I’m teetering between three and three and a half stars for this book. I think that when I picked it up I expected more light, witty commentary and humorous anecdotes about life in the White House. There are some humorous stories, but there are also a lot of amazing, frustrating, and sad stories. It’s less of a humorous book and more of a general memoir/self-help tome, which I discovered partway through (and which reminded me to read book jackets more carefully whilst still at the library to avoid false expectations!).

  • books

    Book review: In the House in the Dark of the Woods, by Laird Hunt

     

    In the House in the Dark of the Woods, by Laird HuntI think that In the House in the Dark of the Woods is one of those books that people will either rate very lowly (and possibly shelve as DNF), because they find it too weird and nonsensical; or rate very highly, and write long reviews praising the genius of the author in crafting it.

    God, did I want to love this book. I mean, just look at that cover! I’m somewhere in the middle, though, at two and a half stars. I did actually finish the book at least, though this is partly due to the fact that it’s so short. But throughout, and afterward, I kept saying “What the hell did I just read?”

  • books

    Book review: Emma in the Night, by Wendy Walker

    Emma in the Night, by Wendy WalkerOne ordinary night, Emma and Cass Tanner disappear. They drive to the beach and seemingly dissolve into thin air. Or maybe only Emma goes to the beach—there’s nothing to say Cass was actually with her. Or maybe they never made it to the beach, though how else do you explain Emma’s shoes left so neatly at the edge of the water?

    That’s not where the story begins, however. It begins on another night, three years later, when Cass Tanner reappears. She has a story to tell about what happened that night, and where she’s been for the past three years. Or maybe she’s gotten some of the details confused, and this memory is a product of a shattered mind. Or maybe she’s flat out lying—something about her story doesn’t sound right to Abby, the FBI psychologist who worked the original case and now returns to interview Cass.

  • books

    Book review: The Last Time I Lied, by Riley Sager

    The Last Time I Lied, by Riley Sager“The time for lies is over.”

    Or is it?

    I absolutely love unreliable narrators. It’s fun retracing my steps to see all the ways they fooled me, the reader. I love guessing at whether they’re being truthful and if not, whether they even realize as much. It adds a delightful layer of mystery to a standard whodunit and increases the tension as I try to decide if I should in fact be suspicious of the hero/ine, rather than cheering them on.

    The Last Time I Lied uses the concept of an unreliable narrator to further the drama surrounding an unsolved disappearance as murky as the waters of the lake at Camp Nightingale, where a trio of teen girls vanishes without a trace. The last person to see them is thirteen-year-old Emma Davis, who watches the girls tiptoe out of their shared cabin late one night, never to return.